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Fascinating Facts About The Urban Park’s ORIGAMe Installation

Relax, unwind, and indulge in a dose of community-drive art with ORIGAMe at Guoco Tower’s Urban Park.

If you’re in the neighbourhood, be sure to drop by Guoco Tower’s Urban Park to admire its latest origami-inspired installation.

ORIGAMe—The latest addition to the park—is an origami-inspired installation that features large, multi-hued paper cranes, folded by members of the public.

Conceptualised by landscape artist Ms Tek Swee Lang—the principal landscape architect at O2X Studios Private Ltd, this vibrant work of art was created as a collaborative effort between Guoco Tower and the Urban Redevelopment Authority (URA).

We had a chat with Ms Tek, and came away with a handful of fun facts about the craft of origami, the inspiration behind the installation and how to nurture the creative spirit in your kids.

If you’re in the neighbourhood, feel free to drop by this beautiful installation and snap a selfie or two!

Inspired by a founding father

While you may have thought that this art piece was inspired by Japanese culture, the source of the idea is a lot closer to home.

“I actually came up with this idea 3-4 years ago, when Singapore’s founding father Lee Kuan Yew passed on,” Ms Tek tells us. “I was thinking about how much he contributed to Singapore and its community, and thought it would have been meaningful if people had folded origami as a sign of respect to him.”

 

Origami symbology

Think of origami, and the most common shape that comes to mind is that of a crane. In Japanese culture, this revered creature was seen as a protector of children, and represents happiness, good fortune and longevity.

When you wish upon a crane

According to Japanese folklore, individuals who fold 1000 origami cranes will have their most heartfelt wish granted. Now you know what to do when you’re hoping for a pay raise or a lifetime supply of milk tea from Dum Dum!

All shapes and sizes

The origami cranes that comprise the installation are much larger than normal-sized pieces, which are often around 15 cm. Fun fact: The smallest origami crane in the world is 0.1 to 0.1 cm, while the largest is 206 feet tall.

I see your true colours shining through

This multi-coloured art installation isn’t just rainbow-hued for visual reasons—The many colours symbolise Singapore’s tight-knit multi-racial community coming together as a whole.

"It’s really heart-warming that a large organisation like URA would take the time and effort to organize the event and execute the installations,” Ms Tek says. “I think it really encourages a sense of community involvement.”

Don’t be the dream police

If you’re the parent of an aspiring Picasso, you may want to let your kid daydream a little between school assignments, according to Ms Tek. “I get inspiration from everywhere, and a lot of it comes from daydreaming,” she shares. “I think it’s definitely good for children to let their minds wander!”

Guoco Tower’s green spaces

“Besides being a really majestic building, I have to say that Guoco Tower’s a beautiful place,” Ms Tek enthuses. “The greenery in the Urban Park is very pleasing, and gives it a cosy feel [for passers-by and visitor].”

Creativity and community at the Urban Park

December is just around the corner, and Christmas vibes are in full swing at Guoco Tower. Exciting events already ongoing at the Urban Park include Christmas markets, live band performances and an illuminated urban pool that’s perfect for frolicking and family photos.

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